NYPD Chief Monahan Promoted To Chief of Department Today Plus 11 Other Executives Promoted During Ceremony

In a ceremony held at One Police Plaza, Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill promoted 12 executives to top NYPD leadership positions. Among the honorees was Chief Terence Monahan who will serve as Chief of Department; the highest ranking uniformed position in the NYPD. As the department continues its operational shift toward Neighborhood Policing, these leaders will advance the NYPD’s mission to continue driving down crime while strengthening bonds with the communities they serve.

“Now is the time to redouble our sense of urgency and to make every neighborhood in New York City safe at all times We need the full partnership of all the people who live in, work in, and play in New York City every day.

Today’s promotions are a major step toward that lofty goal,” said Police Commissioner O’Neill during the promotion ceremony. 

See more photos [HERE].

Promoted today:

Chief of Patrol Terence Monahan to Chief of Department, the NYPD’s highest-uniformed rank.

Chief of Department Terence A. Monahan joined the New York City Police Department in January 1982, and began his career on patrol in the 41 Precinct. He also served in the 34, 41, 44, 46, 48 and 52 Precincts, as well as the Bronx Narcotics Division, Narcotics Borough Manhattan North and Patrol Borough Manhattan North. He was promoted to Sergeant in February 1987; Lieutenant in June 1989; Captain in January 1992; Deputy Inspector in December 1995; Inspector in March 1998; Deputy Chief in February 2003; Assistant Chief in December 2014; and Chief of Patrol in September 2016.

Chief of Department Monahan most recently served as Chief of Patrol. He also served as Commanding Officer of the Office of the Chief of Department, and commanded the 34, 46, and 48 Precincts, and Narcotics Borough Manhattan North. He also served as Executive Officer of the 34 Precinct.

Chief of Department Monahan holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Liberal Arts from Fordham University.

Chief of Department Monahan has been married to his wife, Diane, for 30 years, and they have three children: James, Danny, and Debra. Chief of Department Monahan has a long family history within the NYPD. His grandfather, retired Police Officer John Bowtich, was appointed in 1927; his father, retired Police Officer Terence Monahan Sr., was appointed in 1946; his brother, retired Detective Michael Monahan, was appointed in 1973; and his sister, Denise Monahan, appointed in 2016, is a Police Administrative Aide.

Chief Rodney Harrison, formerly executive officer of the Patrol Services Bureau and leader of the bureau’s Neighborhood Policing implementation, has now become Chief of Patrol. Assistant Chief Harrison began his career with the NYPD as a police cadet in June 1991. A year later, he became a police officer and patrolled the 114th Precinct. He later worked in the Narcotics Division, various commands in Patrol Borough Brooklyn South and Patrol Borough Brooklyn North, Patrol Borough Bronx, and the Internal Affairs Bureau. He served as executive officer of the 28th and 47th Precincts, Patrol Borough Staten Island and Patrol Borough Brooklyn North. He has also served as commanding officer of the 28th and 32nd Precincts, an Internal Affairs Bureau sub-unit, and Detective Borough Brooklyn North.

Chief Edward Delatorre, formerly commanding officer of Patrol Borough Staten Island, has now become Chief of the Transit Bureau. Assistant Chief Delatorre began his career with the NYPD in November 1979 and worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Bronx. He later served as executive officer in the Office of the Chief of Department, the Patrol Services Bureau, Patrol Borough Bronx, Patrol Borough Manhattan North, the Housing Bureau, and the Community Affairs Bureau. He has also served as commanding officer of the 42nd and 43rd Precincts, and the Police Academy.

Chief Nilda Irizarry Hofmann, formerly executive officer of the Risk Management Bureau, has now become Chief of Community Affairs and the first Hispanic woman in the NYPD promoted to three-star chief. Deputy Chief Hofmann began her career with the NYPD in October 1987 as a police administrative aide. Three years later, she became a police officer and worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Bronx and Patrol Borough Manhattan North. She has served as executive officer of the 42nd Precinct, and as commanding officer of the 25th and 52nd Precincts.

Chief Harry Wedin, formerly commanding officer of the Special Operations Division, has now become Chief of Special Operations. Due to reorganization, the position of Chief of Citywide Operations is abolished. Assistant Chief Wedin began his career with the NYPD in January 1981 and worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Brooklyn South. He later served as executive officer of the Special Operations Division, and as commanding officer of the 67th and 72nd Precincts, Strategic Response Group 3, the Operations Division, and the Special Operations Division.

Chief Theresa Shortell, formerly commanding officer of the Police Academy, has now become Chief of Training. Due to reorganization, the position of Deputy Commissioner of Training is abolished. Assistant Chief Shortell began her career with the NYPD in July 1984 and worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Queens South and Patrol Borough Queens North; the Narcotics Division; the Organized Crime Control Bureau; the New York Drug Enforcement Task Force; and the Internal Affairs Bureau. She served as executive officer of the 105th Precinct, and as commanding officer of Transit Bureau District 20; the 6th and 94th Precincts; the Special Victims Division; and the Gang Division.

Chief William Morris, formerly commanding officer of Patrol Borough Manhattan South, has now become Chief of Personnel. Chief Morris began his career with the NYPD in July 1981 and has served in various commands in Patrol Borough Queens South; Patrol Borough Queens North; Patrol Borough Bronx; the Legal Bureau; the Organized Crime Control Bureau; the Narcotics Division; the Central Investigations Division; the Special Victims Division; the Internal Affairs Bureau; and the Police Commissioner’s Office. He also served as executive officer of the Criminal Justice Bureau, and as commanding officer of the 45th, 105th and 113th Precincts, and of the Criminal Justice Bureau.

Chief John Donohue, formerly  assigned to the Police Commissioner’s Office, has now become Chief of Strategic Initiatives. Due to reorganization, the position of Chief of Management Analysis and Planning is abolished. Assistant Chief Donohue began his career with the NYPD in August 1987 as a police cadet. About two years later, he became a police officer and patrolled the 52nd Precinct. He later served in various commands in Patrol Borough Manhattan North and Patrol Borough Bronx. He served as executive officer of the Intelligence Bureau, and as commanding officer of the Office of Management Analysis and Planning.

Chief Fausto Pichardo, formerly commanding officer of the 43rd Precinct, was promoted to Assistant Chief and has now become executive officer of the Patrol Services Bureau. Inspector Pichardo began his career with the NYPD in July 1997 as a police cadet. He became a police officer two years later and patrolled the Midtown North Precinct. He later worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Manhattan North, and the Office of the Deputy Commissioner of Public Information. He served as executive officer of the 28th Precinct, and as commanding officer of the 33rd Precinct.

Chief Stephen Hughes, formerly commanding officer of the Strategic Response Group, has now become Assistant Chief and commanding officer of Patrol Borough Manhattan South. Deputy Chief Hughes began his career with the NYPD in January 1981 and worked in various commands in Patrol Borough Manhattan South and Patrol Borough Manhattan North. He has served as executive officer of the Midtown North Precinct, and commanding officer of the 10th Precinct and the Warrant Section.

Deputy Commissioner Tracie Keesee, Ph.D, formerly head of the Training Bureau, has now become the department’s Equity and Inclusion Officer. In the executive ranks of captain and above during the last four years, the NYPD has increased the number of Hispanics by 15.3%, blacks by 53.8%, and Asians by 130%; women in these ranks increased by 36.5%. “Today, I am establishing an Office of Equity and Inclusion to help continue our progress in this regard,” Commissioner O’Neill said. “This office will monitor diversity within bureaus, divisions and borough commands, and help develop strong women and minority candidates to assume positions of leadership throughout the department. This is essential to creating and sustaining our partnership with New Yorkers, and making the NYPD reflect the community we serve.” Deputy Commissioner Keesee joined the NYPD in February 2016 after working as project director at the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice – a federal initiative that provided training to law enforcement on bias reduction and procedural fairness. Prior to that, she helped start the Center for Policing Equity, which used research to create strategies to develop closer ties between law enforcement and communities. Previously, she served for 25 years as a uniformed member of the Denver Police Department.

Assistant Commissioner Maria Otero will remain in her current assignment at the Office of the Deputy Commissioner of Administration. Executive Director Otero joined the NYPD in June 1992 as a police administrative aide and served in various commands, including the 68th Precinct and Patrol Borough Brooklyn South. She also served as executive officer of the Personnel Orders Section, and commanding officer of the Military Extended Leave Desk.