NYPD Medal Day 2016

NYPD officers were recognized for their bravery, sacrifice and service to New York City in a ceremony Tuesday at Police Headquarters. Mayor Bill de Blasio, Police Commissioner Bill Bratton joined members of the Department and the families of the officers who were honored to recognize members of the NYPD who have gone above and beyond the call of duty.

MOORE_BRIANR_949359 - Copy DETECTIVE FIRST GRADE BRIAN MOORE
105 Precinct

On May 2, 2015, at approximately 6:15 p.m., Police Officer Brian R. Moore was shot multiple times while on patrol in the 105 Precinct. Officer Moore and his partner, Police Officer Erik Jansen, both assigned to the 105 Anti-Crime Unit were patrolling in plainclothes in an unmarked police vehicle in the vicinity of 212 Street and 104 Avenue when they saw a man adjusting an object in his waistband. The officers watched the suspect as he walked southbound on 212 Street and then turned east on 104 Road. Officer Moore positioned the vehicle behind the suspect and inquired about his actions. The man immediately drew a gun from his waistband and fired into the car, striking Police Officer Moore several times. Critically injured, Officer Moore was rushed to Jamaica Hospital, where he succumbed to his injuries two days later. His partner, who narrowly escaped being shot, immediately radioed for assistance and began rendering first aid to his partner. His actions led directly to the apprehension of the perpetrator.
Police Officer Moore’s murderer, a 35-year-old recidivist with an extensive arrest history, was apprehended a short time after the attack inside a nearby dwelling.
Police Officer Moore, 25, joined the New York City Police Department on July 6, 2010 and began his career in the Queens South 103 Precinct Impact Zone. In May 2012, he transferred to the 105 Precinct. During his five-year career, Police Officer Moore was awarded two Excellent Police Duty Medals and two Meritorious Police Duty Medals for exceptional police duty. He made 160 arrests.
Police Officer Moore is survived by his father, Raymond, a retired NYPD sergeant; his mother, Irene; his sister, Christine; his uncle, Ronald J. Moore, a retired NYPD sergeant; and his cousins: NYPD Detective Matthew Janisch; NYPD Police Officers Katie and Timothy Moore; Nassau PD Police Officer (and former NYPD police officer) Ronald Moore; NYPD Police Officer Jennifer Moore (wife of Ronald), and Nassau PD Police Officer John Moore.
On May 8, 2015, at Officer Moore’s funeral, Police Commissioner William J. Bratton posthumously promoted him to Detective First Grade.

HOLDER_RANDOLPHDETECTIVE FIRST GRADE RANDOLPH HOLDER
Police Service Area 5

On October 20, 2015, Police Officer Randolph Holder and other members of his Housing Bureau anti-crime unit were responding to a call of shots fired in the vicinity of East 102 Street and First Avenue, in the East Harlem area of Manhattan covered by Police Service Area 5. Witnesses said that several men had fled along the footpath, heading north along the FDR Drive, adjacent to the river. A man told the officers that his bike had been stolen at gunpoint by one of the suspects.
The plainclothes officers from anti-crime unit encountered a man on a bicycle at East 102 Street on the pedestrian overpass above the FDR. In an exchange of gunfire between the suspect and responding officers, Officer Holder was shot and critically wounded. He died a short time later at Harlem Hospital. Police Officer Holder’s partner, Police Officer Omar Wallace, returned fire striking the gunman in the leg. He radioed critical information that led directly to the suspect’s capture.
Police Officer Holder’s murderer, a 30-year-old recidivist with an extensive arrest history, was apprehended by responding officers several blocks away and taken into custody.
Police Officer Holder was a native of Guyana. He was appointed to the New York City Police Department on July 6, 2010. During his five-year career, Officer Holder was recognized several times for acts of bravery: five times for Excellent Police Duty and one time for Meritorious Police Duty. Police Officer Holder came from a police family; both his father Randolph, Sr., and his grandfather were police officers in Guyana.
He is survived by his fiancée, Mary Muhammad; his father, Randolph A.S. Holder; his stepmother, Princess, and his siblings: Prince, Kelon, Randolph Sion, and Sherry. He was 33 years old.
On October 28, 2015, at Officer Holder’s funeral, Police Commissioner William J. Bratton posthumously promoted him to Detective First Grade. He was given detective shield #9657, his father’s former badge number. His body was flown to his native Guyana, where he was laid to rest, surrounded by his family, friends and a contingent of NYPD officers.

The following members of the service died in the line of duty as a result of illnesses contracted after the rescue and recovery efforts in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks:

rodriguez-flagPOLICE OFFICER PETER O. RODRIGUEZ
Auto Crime Division

Police Officer Peter O. Rodriguez joined the New York City Police Department on March 1, 2000. A 12-year veteran of the NYPD, Police Officer Rodriguez served in several commands during his career, including the Transit Borough Manhattan Task Force, the Narcotics Division, Narcotics Borough Bronx, and the Auto Crime Division. He made 356 arrests over the course of his time with the Department and was recognized four times for Excellent Police Duty and once for Meritorious Police Duty. Officer Rodriguez died on February 12, 2012. He is survived by his parents, Antonio and Josephine; his brothers, Michael, Anthony and Jonathan; and his sisters, Bernadette and Jeanette.
wentz-flagDETECTIVE RICHARD H. WENTZ
Gang Squad Brooklyn North

Detective Richard H. Wentz joined the New York City Police Department on January 25, 1985. A 20-year veteran of the NYPD, Detective Wentz served in several commands during his career, including the 81 Precinct, the Street Crime Unit, Patrol Borough Brooklyn North specialized units, and the Gang Squad Brooklyn North. He made 253 arrests over the course of his time with the Department, and was recognized 26 times for Excellent Police Duty and seven times for Meritorious Police Duty, in addition to receiving three Commendations. Detective Wentz retired on January 26, 2005, and died on May 14, 2013. He is survived by his children, Jenna and Kyle.
burke-flagPOLICE OFFICER JAMES M. BURKE
Fleet Services Division

Police Officer James M. Burke joined the New York City Police Department on January 26, 1982. A 20-year veteran of the NYPD, Police Officer Burke worked in several commands during his career, including the 23, 40, 103, and 110 Precincts, as well as the Fleet Services Division. He made 106 arrests over the course of his time with the Department and was recognized five times for Excellent Police Duty. Officer Burke retired on March 30, 2002, and died on November 6, 2013. He is survived by his parents, Margaret and Eugene; and his brother, John.
johnson-flagPOLICE OFFICER CHERYL D. JOHNSON
115 Precinct

Police Officer Cheryl D. Johnson joined the New York City Police Department on August 30, 1993. Police Officer Johnson was assigned to the 115 Precinct for her entire 20-year career with the Department and made 139 arrests. Officer Johnson died on December 22, 2013. She is survived by her parents, Mildred and Johnnie.

Det John Russo002DETECTIVE FIRST GRADE JOHN A. RUSSO
Technical Assistance and Response Unit

Detective First Grade John A. Russo joined the New York City Police Department on March 28, 1966. During his 36-year career with the NYPD, Detective Russo served in the Detective Bureau, the Internal Affairs Bureau, the Joint Bank Robbery Task Force, and the Technical Assistance and Response Unit. Detective Russo was recognized six times for Excellent Police Duty; twice for Meritorious Police Duty; once with a Commendation; and once for Exceptional Merit. Detective First Grade Russo retired on March 1, 2002 and died on July 22, 2014. He is survived by his wife, Sonia; his children, John and Elaine; and his brother, Vincent.

albanese-flagDETECTIVE JAMES J. ALBANESE
Manhattan South Downtown Narcotics District

Detective James J. Albanese joined the New York City Police Department on April 28, 1987. A 16-year veteran of the NYPD, Detective Albanese worked in several commands during his career, including the 49 Precinct, the Organized Crime Control Bureau, and the Manhattan South Downtown Narcotics District. Over the course of his time with the Department, he made 443 arrests and was recognized six times for Excellent Police Duty; four times for Meritorious Police Duty; and twice with Commendations. Detective Albanese retired on July 1, 2013, and died on August 13, 2014. He is survived by his wife, Jeanette; and his children, Bianca and Francesco.

 

murphy-flagSERGEANT PATRICK P. MURPHY
Emergency Services Squad 5

Sergeant Patrick P. Murphy joined the New York City Police Department on July 25, 1983. During his 21-year career with the Department, Sergeant Murphy served in the 60 and 67 Precincts; the Emergency Service Unit; Emergency Service Squads 2, 5, and 6; and Highway Emergency Service Staten Island. Sergeant Murphy was a recipient of the Medal for Merit/Valor and was also recognized six times for Excellent Police Duty; seven times for Meritorious Police Duty; four times with Commendations; once for Exceptional Merit; and once with an Honorable Mention. Sergeant Murphy retired on July 1, 2004, and died on August 20, 2014. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; his children, Bridgette and Patrick; and his sister, Anne Marie; and his mother, Patricia. His father was former First Deputy Commissioner Patrick Murphy.

scalza-flagSERGEANT DETECTIVE SQUAD STEPHEN P. SCALZA
Organized Crime Control Bureau

Sergeant Detective Squad Stephen P. Scalza joined the New York City Police Department on June 30, 1992. During his 20-year career with the Department, Sergeant Scalza served in several commands, including: the 111 and 113 Precincts; the Narcotics Division; the Queens North Narcotics Division; Narcotics Division Queens North Initiative; and the Organized Crime Control Bureau. He made 220 arrests and was recognized three times for Excellent Police Duty and four times for Meritorious Police Duty, in addition to receiving six Commendations. Sergeant Scalza retired on July 1, 2012, and died on October 1, 2014. He is survived by his wife, Denise; his father, Patrick; and his children, Ryan and Emma.

fernandez-flagDETECTIVE LUIS G. FERNANDEZ
Emergency Service Squad 6

Detective Luis G. Fernandez joined the New York City Police Department on April 30, 1991. During his 23-year career, Detective Fernandez served in the 9 Precinct, the Narcotics Division, Narcotics Borough Manhattan North, the Emergency Service Unit, and Emergency Service Squad 6. Detective Fernandez made 600 arrests and was recognized six times for Excellent Police Duty; twice for Meritorious Police Duty; and twice with Commendations. Detective Fernandez died on October 16, 2014. He is survived by his wife, Maritza; his children, Brianna and Bailley; and his brother, Gustavo.

GUIDAJamesINSPECTOR JAMES GUIDA
Narcotics Division

Inspector James Guida joined the New York City Police Department on October 20, 1981. During his 33-year career with the NYPD, Inspector Guida served in several commands, including Transit Districts 1 and 32; the 42 and 88 Precincts; the 84 and 88 Detective Squads; Brooklyn North Gang Squad; Narcotics Borough Manhattan South; the Narcotics Division; the Vice Enforcement Division; and Housing Borough Brooklyn. He served as commanding officer of the 42 and 88 Precincts; Narcotics Borough Manhattan South; and the Brooklyn North Gang Squad. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from CUNY Queens College. Inspector Guida died on October 31, 2014. He is survived by his wife, Aliceanne; his mother, Anna; and his children, Melissa and Jack.

KaminskiPOLICE OFFICER ROBERT W. KAMINSKI
Fleet Services Division

Police Officer Robert W. Kaminski joined the New York City Transit Police Department on July 8, 1985. He was assigned to Transit Bureau District 1 following the 1995 merger and rounded out his time with the Department in the Fleet Services Division. Over the course of his 20-year career, he made 40 arrests and was also recognized once for Excellent Police Duty. Officer Kaminski retired on July 16, 2005 and died on December 4, 2014. He is survived by his wife, Susan; his son, Michael; and brother, Jamie.

 

mahoney-flagPOLICE OFFICER SHAUN M. MAHONEY
109 Precinct

Police Officer Shaun M. Mahoney joined the New York City Police Department on June 30, 1995 and began his career on patrol in the 109 Precinct, where he remained for the entirety of his 19-year career with the Department. Police Officer Mahoney made over 370 arrests and was recognized once for Excellent Police Duty and once for Meritorious Police Duty. Officer Mahoney died on December 10, 2014. He is survived by his brother, Brendan; and his cousin, Christine.

 

stelmok-flagCAPTAIN SCOTT V. STELMOK
103 Precinct

Captain Scott V. Stelmok joined the New York City Police Department on August 30, 1993, and began his career on patrol in the Midtown South Precinct. During his 20-year career with the Department, Captain Stelmok made over 100 arrests and served in several commands, including the 100, 104, 108, and 112 Precincts; Patrol Borough Queens South; and Patrol Borough Queens North. He served as executive officer of the 103 Precinct. Captain Stelmok retired on December 31, 2013 and died on December 29, 2014. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne; his father, Alfred; his daughter, Ashley; and brother, Jeffrey.

BONANOStevenDEPUTY CHIEF STEVEN J. BONANO
Patrol Borough Brooklyn South

Deputy Chief Steven J. Bonano joined the NYPD on January 26, 1982. A veteran of the U.S. Navy, Deputy Chief Bonano’s public service career spanned four decades. During his 33-year career with the Department, Deputy Chief Bonano served in several commands including the 23, 34, 45, 46, and 52 Precincts, Vice Enforcement, the Aviation Unit, the Emergency Service Unit (ESU), the Community Affairs Bureau, and Patrol Borough Brooklyn South. As commanding officer of ESU during 9/11, Deputy Chief Bonano played a decisive role in the Department’s rescue and recovery efforts. He also served as commanding officer of the 23 Precinct and executive officer of both the Community Affairs Bureau and Patrol Borough Brooklyn South. An accomplished licensed pilot, Deputy Chief Bonano also spent many years with the NYPD Aviation Unit and was a recipient of the Department’s second-highest medal, the Police Combat Cross. Over the course of his time with the NYPD, he made 385 arrests and was recognized 44 times for Excellent Police Duty; 12 times for Meritorious Police Duty; 10 times with Commendations; and once with an Honorable Mention. He earned a Master of Public Administration degree from Harvard University. Deputy Chief Bonano died on January 17, 2015. He is survived by his parents, Eulogio and Vivian; his brother, Anthony; his sister, Lisa; and his fiancée, Miriam Rivera.

 

ciacio-flagPOLICE OFFICER PETER D. CIACCIO
Medical Division

Police Officer Peter D. Ciaccio joined the New York City Police Department on July 8, 1985 and began his career on patrol in the 34 Precinct. He also served in Patrol Borough Manhattan North Task Force, Patrol Borough Manhattan North, and the Medical Division. During his 21-year career with the NYPD, Police Officer Ciaccio made 53 arrests, and was recognized once for Excellent Police Duty and once for Meritorious Police Duty. Officer Ciaccio retired on November 1, 2006 and died on February 12, 2015. He is survived by his wife, Siobhan; his parents, Christa and Peter; his sister, Cindy; and his brothers, Kenneth and Christopher.

fishkin-flagDETECTIVE STUART F. FISHKIN
Fleet Services Division

Detective Stuart F. Fishkin joined the New York City Police Department on July 28, 1987. A 17-year veteran of the NYPD, Detective Fishkin served in several commands during his career, including the 32 and 103 Precincts; the Street Crime Unit; the Taxi Squad; and the Fleet Services Division. Over the course of his time with the Department, he made 151 arrests and was recognized 10 times for Excellent Police Duty and four times for Meritorious Police Duty. Detective Fishkin retired on March 1, 2004 and died on May 8, 2015. He is survived by his wife, Donna; and his children, Michael, Faith, and Amanda.

MEDAL OF HONOR

Healey 16-1009-007POLICE OFFICER
KENNETH HEALEY
Technical Assistance & Response Unit

COMBAT CROSS

Kraft 6-0917-008cropPOLICE OFFICER
TAYLOR KRAFT
103 Precinct

Meeker 16-1008-007POLICE OFFICER
JOSEPH MEEKER
103 Precinct

Rivera 16-0916-007cropPOLICE OFFICER
PETER RIVERA
103 Precinct

On October 23, 2014, at approximately 1400 hours, police officers from the 103 Precinct in Queens – Kenneth Healey, Joseph Meeker, Taylor Kraft, and Peter Rivera – were patrolling on foot when a deranged man charged at them, without warning or provocation, waving a hatchet in an incident that was later categorized as a terrorist attack on police.
The four officers had been posing for a freelance photographer in front of 162-10 Jamaica Avenue when, a 32-year-old man removed a blue-handled metal hatchet from a backpack and ran wildly towards the officers swinging the weapon.
What happened next, unfolded within seconds. The man first struck Officer Meeker in the right forearm, causing a severe contusion. He then raised his weapon and struck Police Officer Healey on the back of his head, resulting in a life-threatening injury. Officer Healey collapsed semiconscious on the sidewalk, bleeding profusely.
Rising to the defense of their injured comrades, Police Officers Kraft and Rivera drew their firearms and discharged a barrage of rounds at the unhinged attacker, who fell dead with the weapon still in his hand.
Officer Meeker provided first-aid to the gravely injured Officer Healey. Officer Rivera radioed a 10-13, requesting emergency medical assistance. Because of the severity of Officer Healy’s injuries, Healy’s companions and other responding officers – including Sergeant John Boyce and Police Officers Michael Guzman, and PO Richard Zononi – determined that further wait for emergency assistance would jeopardize Officer Healey’s life.
Together, they lifted their bleeding comrade into a police vehicle and rushed him to the emergency room at nearby Jamaica Hospital. Listed in critical condition, Officer Healey suffered a fractured skull, severe laceration to his brain, dislocated bone fragments to the skull, and extreme blood loss.
Officer Healey survived his wounds and is here with us today to receive the Department’s Medal of Honor. For their rapid response and selfless assistance to an uncommon emergency, Officers Meeker, Kraft, and Rivera earned the Police Combat Cross.

COMBAT CROSS

Paul-Blanc 16-1016-004DETECTIVE
VALERY PAUL-BLANC
63 Detective Squad

MEDAL FOR VALOR

PO-PorterPOLICE OFFICER
THOMAS PORTER
63 Detective Squad

On September 20, 2006, at approximately 2150 hours, then-Police Officer Valery Paul-Blanc and Police Officer Thomas Porter, on plainclothes bicycle patrol in Brooklyn, were involved in a line-of-duty shooting that has earned them Department Commendations.
The incident began with a report of a man with a gun attempting to steal a Range Rover on Clarendon Road, between Flatbush Avenue and East 22nd Street. According to the civilian making the report, the suspect had already used the gun to blow out the left rear window of the vehicle to gain entry.
Officers Paul-Blanc and Porter located a 2003 black Range Rover that matched the radio description that was occupied by a single individual. The officers approached the car with their shields displayed and their weapons drawn and ordered the man to step out.
Exiting the Range Rover as ordered, the man broke into a run, fleeing east along Clarendon Road and ignoring the officers’ orders to stop. The suspect turned and fired two shots in the direction of Officer Paul-Blanc, who was not hit.
The officers pursued him to East 22nd Street and Cortelyou Road, where the man entered a parked Lincoln Town Car. Both officers took cover at the intersection as the suspect raised his right arm and pointed his gun at Officer Paul-Blanc.
Both officers fired their weapons at the gunman, who was not struck. His car sped east along Cortelyou Road. Officers Paul-Blanc and Porter radioed a description of the vehicle. Responding units arrested the gunman and recovered his weapon and vehicle a short time later.

COMBAT CROSS

POLICE OFFICER
JOSE JIMENEZ
Police Service Area 9

Nunez 16-1054-011cropPOLICE OFFICER
RONY NUNEZ
Police Service Area 2

MEDAL FOR VALOR

Lockel 16-0992-005cropSERGEANT
CHRISTOPHER LOCKEL
Patrol Borough Queens North

On November 2, 2012, at approximately 2055 hours, Housing Bureau Police Officers Jose Jimenez and Rony Nunez were involved in an on-duty shooting with an armed perpetrator, just minutes after the gunman had attempted to rob a civilian at a bus shelter.
Responding to a report of shots fired in the vicinity of 41-09 12th Street, Officers Jimenez and Nunez saw a man matching the radio dispatcher’s description.
The officers chased the suspect into the courtyard of the Queensbridge houses at 41-13 12th Street and transmitted their location for backup. Sergeant Christopher Lockel responded to the call from another direction and joined the pursuit.
The perpetrator turned and pointed a .380 caliber weapon in the direction of the pursuing officers. All three responding officers returned fire, discharging one round each at the gunman.
The suspect was struck in the right thigh, sustaining a superficial wound, but showed no signs that he was injured. He ran east inside the courtyard toward 21st Street. The three officers pursued him and, with help from other responding police units, apprehended the gunman in front of 41-09 12th Street.
Further investigation revealed that the gunman had attempted to rob a civilian at gunpoint just prior to the police chase. When the civilian resisted, the perpetrator fired his gun three times. It was those shots that Officers Jimenez and Nunez heard and responded to.

COMBAT CROSS

16-1020-009 Sean_ HigginsPOLICE OFFICER
SEAN HIGGINS
43 Precinct

16-1021-018 Jennifer NicalekPOLICE OFFICER
JENNIFER NICALEK
43 Precinct

schad 16-0931-008cropPOLICE OFFICER
JOHN SCHAD
Housing Bureau

MEDAL FOR VALOR
Thomas 16-0991-006cropDETECTIVE
JAMES THOMAS
Midtown North Detective Squad

COLLAZO 16-0985POLICE OFFICER
JOSE COLLAZO
Police Service Area 8

On October 31, 2013 at about 2300 hours, Police Officer John Schad and another officer both assigned to the Bronx/Queens Housing Impact Response Team, were patrolling on foot in the 43 Precinct. Responding to a call of shots fired, the officers located a man matching the description of the shooter, who pulled out a pistol and began shooting at them. Officers Patel and Schad returned fire and called for additional officers as the suspect fled on foot
Police Officer Jose Collazo and then-Police Officer James Thomas of Police Service Area 8 responded by car. When they stepped out of their vehicle, the suspect pointed his gun at them, and they responded by firing two rounds each at the suspect. At the same time, Police Officer Brian Higgins and Police Officer Jennifer Nicalek of the 43Precinct, also responding by car, fired at the suspect after exiting their vehicle.
The gunman fell to the pavement and succumbed to his injuries. A .45 caliber semi-automatic handgun was found next to the suspect.

COMBAT CROSS

Betts 16-1015-015SERGEANT
STEVEN BETTS
110 Precinct

Phillips 16-1024-017cropPOLICE OFFICER
SHAWN PHILIPS
105 Precinct

On February 2, 2010, at 0825, Police Officers Steven Betts and Shawn Phillips responded to a radio run of a 10-30, or home invasion, in Queens. As they approached the scene, they saw a vehicle at 131st Street and Foch Boulevard that matched the description of the vehicle reported in the call, as well as in another gunpoint robbery reported to police only minutes before.
As the officers followed the vehicle, a white Ford Focus, it accelerated through a stop sign and took off. Activating lights and sirens, Officers Phillips and Betts gave pursuit. The two men in the Ford led the officers on a vehicle chase that covered some three and one half miles in four minutes. During the pursuit, the vehicle’s passenger leaned out his window, and fired several rounds with a black firearm at the RMP.
The police cruiser chased the Ford across precinct lines into the 113, where both perpetrators jumped out of the moving vehicle and fled on foot. The unoccupied vehicle continued struck four parked cars and finally came to a stop in front of 153-02 119th Avenue.
Phillips and Betts shouted to the men to stop, but their commands were ignored. According to a civilian witness, at least one of the two perpetrators pointed and fired upon Officers Phillips and Betts.
Both officers returned fire. Officer Phillips discharged his weapon eight times and Officer Betts got off two rounds. Both officers continued to pursue the gunmen on foot, transmitting their location to other police units. One of the perpetrators was apprehended by another responding officer, and the second perpetrator was arrested the following day.
Police recovered a Glock Model 19, with three live rounds in the magazine and one live round in the chamber. It was later learned that the Ford Focus had been stolen. Items reported stolen in the robberies were found inside the abandoned vehicle.

COMBAT CROSS

16-0946-011 Frank_FerraraSERGEANT
FRANK FERRARA
Emergency Service Squad 9

Ayala 16-0987-008cropDETECTIVE
KENNETH AYALA
Emergency Service Squad 6

GRANAHAN 16-0984DETECTIVE
MATTHEW GRANAHAN
Emergency Service Squad 7

Keenan 16-0989-003cropDETECTIVE
MICHAEL KEENAN
Emergency Service Squad 6

CaptainAlfonsoPizzanoRETIRED CAPTAIN
ALFONSO PIZZANO
Emergency Service Unit

Murphy Timothy_PO_MedalDay_composite_HS_8x10RETIRED DETECTIVE
TIMOTHY MURPHY
Emergency Service Unit

RETIRED DETECTIVE
JOSEPH PENNY
Emergency Service Squad 7 (no photo)

On April 8, 2012, at approximately 0027 hours, members of the 61 Precinct anti-crime team responded to a radio call of a man with a gun inside an apartment building. After speaking with people on the scene who had witnessed the perpetrator wave the firearm at them, the officers conferred with the building’s superintendent to identify the perpetrator’s apartment and requested ESU to respond.
The following members of ESU responded to the scene and took tactical positions outside of the apartment: Captain Alfonso Pizzano; Sergeant Frank Ferrara, ESS9; Detective Kenneth Ayala, ESS6; Detective Michael Keenan, ESS6; Detective Matthew Granahan, ESS7; Detective Timothy Murphy; and Detective Joseph Penny, ESS7.
The ESU personnel repeatedly tried to engage the perpetrator in dialogue. A woman yelled out that she was inside the apartment with her infant child and wanted to leave. The officers managed her safe exit but after she and the child were clear, the perpetrator emerged and fired his weapon numerous times at the ESU officers. Detective Ayala returned fire while Detective Keenan communicated with the other ESU officer about the situation. When the ESU members entered the apartment, they were again fired upon by the perpetrator. Despite sustaining multiple injuries, they were able to return fire, and the perpetrator was struck non-fatally.
Detective Ayala was struck in the left hip and foot, Detective Granahan was struck in the right leg, Detective Keenan was struck in the left knee, Captain Pizzano received a graze wound on his upper lip, and Sergeant Ferrara received a graze wound on his right knee.
The perpetrator was apprehended. Three firearms and ammunition were recovered.

COMBAT CROSS

Levay 16-0999-007cropDETECTIVE
MICHAEL LEVAY
123 Detective Squad

13-0421-007 Lukasz_KozickiPOLICE OFFICER
LUKASZ KOZICKI
Transit District 34

On January 3, 2013, at approximately 1930 hours, plainclothes Transit Police Officers Michael Levay and Lukasz Kozicki were patrolling a Manhattan-bound N subway train, when they observed a man walking between subway car doors, a violation of transit rules and regulations.
The officers identified themselves, displayed their shields, and asked the man to exit the train with them as it pulled into the Fort Hamilton Parkway subway station. The man gave every indication that he would comply. Then, he abruptly reached into his waist band, pulled out a Taurus 9mm handgun, and opened fire on both officers inside the subway car, discharging six rounds.
Police Officer Kozicki was struck by three rounds in the right leg and groin. Police Officer Levay was struck once in the back, but his bullet-resistant vest stopped the bullet. The force of the gunshot threw Officer Levay to the ground. Officer Levay drew his firearm and returned fire, striking and killing the perpetrator.
The perpetrator’s firearm was recovered along with an operable laser sight and a 3-inch knife. A civilian passenger suffered a nonlife-threatening graze wound to his left leg during the gunfire.
The actions of Police Officers Michael Levay and Lukasz Kozicki showed exceptional bravery while attempting to apprehend a dangerous subject. The perpetrator had an arrest record in New York City for numerous assault and weapons possession charges and a similar criminal history in California.

COMBAT CROSS

Matthews 16-0988-015cropPOLICE OFFICER
DANIEL MATTHEWS
Highway Unit 1

While on patrol on September 3, 2011, officers assigned to the 45 Precinct were approached by a man who reported that he and his 10-year-old son had just been shot.
The occupants of another vehicle had fired numerous rounds into his car, striking him in the hand and his son in the right torso and elbow. The officers relayed a description of the perpetrators and their vehicle over department radio. A lieutenant on patrol in the 45 Precinct spotted a car matching the description and attempted to stop it, but the suspects fled and a pursuit ensued. As updated locations were transmitted, Police Officer Daniel Matthews from the 43 Precinct joined the chase, eventually becoming the lead, and then the only remaining police vehicle pursuing the suspects. The perpetrator’s car crashed into a fence after recklessly attempting a high-speed turn. The vehicle’s driver fled on foot, but a passenger stepped out of the car and pointed a .38 caliber Colt revolver at Officer Matthews. The officer exited his vehicle to apprehend the suspect, only to be met with gunfire. The officer took cover behind the police vehicle, and the perpetrator fled on foot. Officer Matthews gave chase, and the two engaged in a gun battle, ultimately culminating when Officer Matthews’ struck the perpetrator in the rear lower torso. The perpetrator was apprehended by responding officers. The other perpetrator was arrested separately.

COMBAT CROSS

KochPOLICE OFFICER
JOSEPH KOCH
101 Precinct

On June 16, 2013, Police Officer Joseph Koch, assigned to the 101 Precinct, was off-duty, and celebrating Father’s Day with his family at his father-in-law’s house in Jamaica, Queens, when he heard the faint wails of a woman in distress followed by cries for help from a 10-year-old boy, just a house away, screaming that someone was killing his mother. Officer Koch quickly ran to aid the boy, who directed him to his house. He told the boy to stay back, and entered the house through an open front door with his shield displayed. He saw a man holding a blood-covered woman by the throat. She had been savagely beaten and was screaming desperately for help. Officer Koch identified himself as as a police officer, and told the man release the woman. The perpetrator responded, “I’m going to kill you too.” The man lunged at Officer Koch with a knife, and the officer drew his gun. A physical struggle ensued as the men fought for control of the gun. During the fight, two shots were fired. The first struck Officer Koch in his left hand, and the second hit the perpetrator in the neck. The man tried once more to take hold of the firearm, and Officer Koch discharged one more shot that struck the perpetrator in the abdomen. Bleeding profusely from his left hand, Officer Koch ran to the front door to tell his fiancé to call 911. He stayed with the victims, his gun trained on the perpetrator, until help arrived.

COMBAT CROSS

Muniz 16-0977-007cropDETECTIVE
MARIO MUNIZ
Warrant Section

On the afternoon of July 28, 2014 Detective Mario Muniz of the Regional Fugitive Task Force and U.S. Marshals were attempting to locate a suspect wanted in California for lewd and lascivious acts with a minor. Working on a tip, Detective Muniz entered a smoke shop in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village while U.S. Marshals waited outside. Detective Muniz observed the wanted man and signaled to the waiting Marshals to enter the store. Upon entering, the wanted suspect fired five rounds from a revolver at Detective Muniz and the marshals. At this time Detective Muniz was struck three times, twice in the bullet resistant vest and once in the abdomen. The U.S. Marshals returned fire striking the perpetrator who later died from his injuries. Detective Muniz was rushed to a local hospital by responding officers where he was treated for the gunshot wound. The firearm used by the perpetrator was recovered.

COMBAT CROSS

Lisi 16-0970-010cropSERGEANT
ANTHONY LISI
Emergency Service Squad 5

Colangelo 16-0979-001cropDETECTIVE
RICHARD COLANGELO
Emergency Service Squad 6

GRANAHAN 16-0984DETECTIVE
MATTHEW GRANAHAN
Emergency Service Squad 7

McLaughlin 16-0969-007cropDETECTIVE
SHAWN MCLAUGHLIN
Emergency Service Squad 5

MOLINA 16-0983DETECTIVE
NOAH MOLINA
Emergency Service Unit 7

Reed 16-0971-007cropDETECTIVE
ROBERT REED
Emergency Service Unit 5

SCHIERENBECK 16-0982DETECTIVE
ROBERT SCHIERNBECK
Emergency Service Squad 7

On August 14, 2015, at about 0545 hours, members of the Regional Fugitive Task Force— comprising four NYPD detectives and four United States marshals—were attempting to execute a federal probation and weapons possession warrant on a known suspect residing in the 121 Precinct.
As the officers entered the suspect’s basement apartment, they observed smoke, and the Task Force members retreated. The Fire Department responded, and when an FDNY lieutenant entered the locations several gunshots were heard. The FDNY lieutenant was shot in the leg and quickly withdrew from the apartment. A 10-13 was broadcast at 0606 hours.
NYPD Emergency Service Unit personnel responded to the scene, including Sergeant Anthony Lisi, ESS 5; Detective Shawn McLaughlin, ESS 5; Detective Robert Reed, ESS 5; Detective Richard Colangelo, ESS 6; Detective Matthew Granahan, ESS 7; Detective Noah Molina, ESS 7; and Detective Robert Schierenbeck, ESS 7. They immediately secured the area, establishing inner and outer perimeters as more gunshots were heard coming from inside the residence.
With the location surrounded, Hostage Negotiation Team members negotiated with the suspect for approximately six hours. All through this time, the suspect fired multiple rounds toward the officers, including a barrage of automatic gunfire that struck an armored ESU vehicle five times.
Eventually, the suspect emerged wearing a bullet-resistant vest and firing a fully automatic AK-47 assault rifle at ESU personnel. The tactically positioned ESU members, including Sergeant Lisi, Detectives McLaughlin, Reed, Colangelo, Granahan, Molina, and Schierenbeck, returned fire killing the gunman. Three handguns, an assault rifle, more than 30 rounds of ammunition, and a spent smoke grenade were recovered at the scene. No members of the service or civilians were injured.

MEDAL FOR VALOR

Soto 16-1038-011cropPOLICE OFFICER
MIGUEL SOTO
79 Precinct

On the afternoon of November 2, 2013, Police Officer Miguel Soto and his partners assigned to the 79 Precinct Conditions Team were addressing quality of life conditions inside a New York City playground when Police Officer Soto observed two men running on the adjacent sidewalk. The two males who were running were being chased by a third male in possession of a firearm. Police Officer Soto immediately yelled “gun” and began to chase the man who was brandishing the weapon. During the foot pursuit Police Officer Soto witnessed the armed suspect fire his weapon at the two men who he was originally chasing. The armed suspect then turned and pointed his weapon towards Police Officer Soto, at which point Police Officer Soto maintained firearms control, ensured there were no bystanders nearby and fired his service weapon. The perpetrator was struck two times and subsequently arrested. The firearm used by the perpetrator was recovered.

UNIT CITATION

67 PRECINCT
In 2015, the 67 Precinct provided a high level of service to the people of New York City by achieving a 9.5 percent decrease in major index crimes. Significant reductions included: Felonious Assault by 15.3 percent, Burglary by 15.3 percent, and Robbery by 10.3 percent. The dedicated efforts of the members of the 67 Precinct Special Operations Unit resulted in them leading the city in Grand Larceny Auto arrests. The 67 Precinct made 53 gun arrests, with an additional 11 firearms seized through search warrants.

73 PRECINCT
In 2015, the 73 Precinct provided a high level of service to the people of New York City by achieving a 7.7 percent decrease in major index crimes. Significant reductions included: Burglary by 39.1 percent; Murder by 22.2 percent, and Robbery by 10.7 percent. Shooting incidents in the precinct decreased by 12.7 percent, and the number of shooting victims by 12 percent. Increased efforts to identify and address areas with crime problems resulted in 16 search warrants, yielding seven firearms and large amounts of narcotics. In efforts to combat crew related violence, the 73 Precinct Special Operations Unit, through ongoing investigations, including the use of social media, recovered of 24 firearms.

75 PRECINCT
In 2015, the 75 Precinct provided a high level of service to the people of New York City by achieving a 6.6 percent decrease in major index crimes and the largest raw number decrease in crime within Patrol Borough Brooklyn North. Increased efforts to identify and address areas with crime problems resulted in a 122 percent increase in gun arrests. Significant reductions included: Murder by 14.3 percent, Rape by 17.6 percent, Robbery 10.6 percent, and Burglary by 17.2 percent. In an effort to combat crew related violence, the 75 Special Operations Unit, working with Operation Crew Cut, secured a 7-person conspiracy indictment against a notorious local crew. Through ongoing investigations, including the use of social media, several member of the crew were arrested.

113 PRECINCT
In 2015, the 113 Precinct provided a high level of service to the people of New York City by achieving a 15.2 percent decrease in major index crimes. Significant reductions included: Grand Larceny Auto by 36.8 percent, Burglary by 23.8 percent, Felonious Assault by 14.4 percent, and Robbery by 11.1 percent. Shooting incidents in the precinct decreased by 31 percent, while the number of shooting victims decreased by 38 percent. The dedicated efforts of the 113 Precinct domestic violence reduction initiatives led to a 17.1 reduction of domestic violence crimes, as well as a 14.5 percent reduction in domestic assaults.

POLICE SERVICE AREA 4
In 2015, members of Police Service Area 4 sustained a high level of service to the people of New York City by achieving the largest total reduction in Index Crimes of all Police Service Areas in Manhattan. Significant reductions included: Rape by 9 percent; and Grand Larceny by 20 percent.
Additionally, Police Service Area 4 increased efforts regarding efficiency in combatting gun violence resulted in a 250 percent increase in gun arrests. Police Service Area 4 displayed dedication to improved police-community relations as their Explorer post did over 1,600 hundred hours of community service in 2015, earning the Boy Scouts of America “Learning For Life Gold Award” for community Service.

44 PRECINCT DETECTIVE SQUAD
In 2015, the 44 Precinct Detective Squad sustained a high level of service to the people of New York City by closing 7 of 11 homicide investigations to arrest, for a 63.64 percent clearance rate. The unit also cleared 16 of 48 shooting incidents to arrest resulting in a clearance rate of 33.33 percent. Additionally, the 44 Precinct Detective Squad affected a total of 917 arrests. Working in cooperation with and assisting multiple Bronx Precinct Detective Units, as well as state and federal agencies, the 44 Precinct Detective Squad was instrumental in the notable arrests of 26 suspects as part of a take-down of the violent street crew “Six Wild,” who was responsible for four shootings, including one homicide. Furthermore, the 44 Precinct Detective Squad arrested 15 persons identified as members of a robbery crew known as “65,” who were responsible for 19 robberies in the vicinity of Mullay Park.
48 PRECINCT DETECTIVE SQUAD
During this period, the 48 Precinct Detective Squad sustained a high level of service to the people of New York City by closing 5 of 6 Homicide investigations to arrest, for an 83 percent clearance rate. The unit also cleared 18 of 24 shooting incidents to arrest resulting in a clearance rate of 75 percent in 2015. Additionally, they achieved a clearance rate of 72 percent closing 13 of the 18 non-fatal shooting incidents to arrest, ranking them amongst the highest in the Detective Bureau. Furthermore, the 48 Precinct Detective Squad affected a total of 1041 arrests. Working in cooperation with and assisting multiple Bronx Precinct Detective Units, as well as state and federal agencies, the 48 Precinct Detective Squad was instrumental in the arrests of an individual wanted for the highly publicized murder of a livery cab driver, as well as an individual wanted for several shootings in the Bronx, with one fatal shooting that led to federal charges.

90 PRECINCT DETECTIVE SQUAD
During this period, the 90 Precinct Detective Squad sustained a high level of service to the people of New York City by closing 5 of 6 Homicide investigations to arrest, for an 83 percent clearance rate. The unit also cleared 14 of 21 shooting incidents to arrest resulting in a clearance rate of 66.6 percent in 2015. Additionally, the 90 Precinct Detective Squad affected a total of 534 arrests, a 27.1 percent increase from calendar year 2014. During 2015, the 90 Precinct Detective Squad was instrumental in the notable arrests of four members of the violent street crew “900 Crew”, who were responsible for an execution-style murder of a Brooklyn man. Additionally, they were instrumental in the arrest of a perpetrator wanted for the reckless shooting into a crowd of students which struck two 14-year olds. Furthermore, working in cooperation with TARU, Brooklyn North Homicide Squad, the 90 Squad was able to close a murder/sexual assault case to arrest that stretched across to Manhattan

BUILDING MAINTENANCE SECTION
THE OFFICE OF DEPUTY COMMISSIONER MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET
In 2015, the Office of the Deputy Commissioner Management and Budget sustained a high level of service to the people of New York City providing $48.5 million to increase the uniform headcount by 1,297 new officers; $10.06 million to hire 520 police cadets; $117.8 million for Homeland Security grants including: Urban Areas Security Initiatives, the Law Enforcement Terrorism Protection Program, Transit and Port Security grants, and the Bomb Squad Initiative. Furthermore, they were instrumental in acquiring more than $12 million to procure new bulletproof vests. Increased efforts to create transparency and build trust with the community, the Office of Deputy Commissioner Management and Budget secured $3.782 million to procure 1,500 body cameras, which included costs for data storage, operation of body camera data, and backend systems. They also oversaw the Re-engineering Management Team, the Faculties Management Team and the Office of Management Analysis and Planning which are responsible for making the Department operate in a more effective and efficient manner.

NARCOTICS BOROUGH BROOKLYN NORTH
In 2015, members of the Narcotics Borough Brooklyn North sustained a high level of service to the people of New York City by increasing the number of executed search warrants by 10 percent; 552 vs. 501 from the previous calendar year. Additionally, Narcotics Borough Brooklyn North recovered 98 firearms. The Narcotics Borough Brooklyn North VICE Module increased its search warrant execution rate by 48 percent; 83 vs. 53 in the previous calendar year, and showed a 41 percent increase in undercover case buys. Furthermore, Narcotics Borough Brooklyn North on a whole made 1,995 felony arrests; 2034 misdemeanor arrests; and 32 violation arrests, while seizing nine vehicles, and $269,034 United States currency. The Narcotics Borough Brooklyn North Major case Unit took down 11 Federal and State prosecuted Long-Term investigations in 2015, resulting in over 500 positive buys by undercover; over 60 arrests; and over 40 firearms seized.

DEPUTY COMMISSIONER, TRAINING
In 2015, the Training Bureau shifted all staff and training material from the old academy building in Manhattan to the new facility in College Point Queens, while meeting all mandatory training needs for Department personnel city-wide. In addition, the Training Bureau implemented several new training programs and initiatives including a 15-day Recruit Officer Field Orientation program, which included assignments to each of the Department’s 98 commands and meeting with over 800 community partners; training on the use of Belt trauma kits; utilizing Department issued tourniquets and hemostatic agent for severe bleeding and/or gunshot wounds; and the administration of the anti-opioid, Naloxone, providing life-saving procedures while on patrol. Increased efforts to provide educational opportunities to both uniformed and civilian members of service Department wide, the Training Bureau’s Scholarship Unit processed the awarding of 90 scholarships, including two to Harvard. Additionally, 2015 marked the fourth successful re-accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies. Furthermore, the Training Bureau hosted four Police Commissioner All-in conferences, three presentations of the production of Anne and Emmett, the 2015 Women’s Conference, the street renaming dedication in honor of Patrolman Phillip Cardillo, as well as the formal ribbon cutting ceremony celebrating the new facility.